Book Review: “Global Marine Science and Carlsberg”

By Vera Schwach Bo Poulsen, Global Marine Science and Carlsberg. The Golden Connections of Johannes Schmidt (1877–1933), (Brill) Leiden/Boston, 2016, 524 pages, (illustrated, references and with an index). By a historical coincidence, the celebrated brewery, Carlsberg, helped promote marine science during the period from around 1900 to 1930. The key actor in cajoling support from… Read More Book Review: “Global Marine Science and Carlsberg”

Emperor Hirohito: The Marine Biologist Who Ruled Japan

Exactly seventy years ago today Japan surrendered to the United States, bringing an end to World War II and signaling the start of the American occupation. Under the direction of the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers, General Douglas MacArthur, and his protégé General Bonner Fellers, the U.S. military began the process of Japanese war-crimes prosecutions.… Read More Emperor Hirohito: The Marine Biologist Who Ruled Japan

#PlatformsMatter: Design and the Marine Environment

One of the hashtags often used by the U.S. Navy in their various social media feeds is #PlatformsMatter. The term now frequently pops into my head while I’m doing research – a 21st century mantra for the marine historian. The importance of engineering and design for marine work is something I’ve thought about with respect to… Read More #PlatformsMatter: Design and the Marine Environment

“Cosmos”, C. C. Patterson, and “What the Fish Knew” about the Deep Sea

  Last night I caught up with the latest episode of Cosmos, the rebooted Carl Sagan series now hosted by Neil Degrasse Tyson. Among the many pleasures of the new series is the amount of time given over to the history of science. As academic historians, of course, we inevitably find ways of critiquing the… Read More “Cosmos”, C. C. Patterson, and “What the Fish Knew” about the Deep Sea