The Abyss: Resurrecting Deep-Sea Biology in the Mid Twentieth Century

Author: Eric L. Mills Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada) History of Science and Technology Programme, University of King’s College (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada) Abstract After the publication of the last Challenger Report in 1895, deep-sea biology fell out of favor with marine biologists. It was replaced by embryology and physiology in… Read More The Abyss: Resurrecting Deep-Sea Biology in the Mid Twentieth Century

A Forgotten Aspect of the Famous Last Voyage of the Carnegie: It Entangled Harald Sverdrup, Roger Revelle and Herbert Graham in Oceanography

By John R. Dolan Sorbonne Université, CNRS UMR 7093 Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche-sur-Mer, 06230 Villefranche-sur-Mer, France Introduction The Carnegie was an unusual ship, a non-magnetic (iron-free) 44 m brigantine yacht designed to conduct surveys of terrestrial magnetism. In 1927 the vessel was overhauled and re-fitted for a 3-year global voyage, Cruise VII, dedicated not only to magnetism but… Read More A Forgotten Aspect of the Famous Last Voyage of the Carnegie: It Entangled Harald Sverdrup, Roger Revelle and Herbert Graham in Oceanography

The famous and lesser-known illustrations of Thomas Huxley’s Bathybius

By John R. Dolan Sorbonne Université, CNRS UMR 7093 Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche-sur-Mer, 06230 Villefranche-sur-Mer, France During the 1860s and 1870s the Darwinian Revolution was in full swing. Darwin’s critics pointed out that the origin of life was not addressed and that there appeared to be many missing links among taxa both existing and fossil.… Read More The famous and lesser-known illustrations of Thomas Huxley’s Bathybius

Reckoning with a Racist Legacy in Ocean Science

By Penelope K. Hardy and Helen M. Rozwadowski   Among the numerous Confederate statues targeted by protesters around the country, the one of Matthew Fontaine Maury in Richmond, Virginia, inspired only the vague graffiti condemnation, “Fuck this guy too.” Maury, who is familiar to oceanographers, historians of the ocean sciences, generations of naval officers, and… Read More Reckoning with a Racist Legacy in Ocean Science

Emperor Hirohito: The Marine Biologist Who Ruled Japan

Exactly seventy years ago today Japan surrendered to the United States, bringing an end to World War II and signaling the start of the American occupation. Under the direction of the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers, General Douglas MacArthur, and his protégé General Bonner Fellers, the U.S. military began the process of Japanese war-crimes prosecutions.… Read More Emperor Hirohito: The Marine Biologist Who Ruled Japan